Users Online: 230
Home Print this page Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Search Browse articles Submit article Ahead of Print Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 72

Characterization of the cognitive and motor changes revealed by the elevated plus maze in an experimental rat model of radiation-induced brain injury


1 Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Neuroscience Laboratory, The University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon; Department of Translational Neuroscience, Brain Research Africa Initiative (BRAIN), Geneva, Switzerland; Department of Translational Neuroscience, Brain Research Africa Initiative (BRAIN); Department of Neurology, Yaoundé Central Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon
2 Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Neuroscience Laboratory, The University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon; Department of Translational Neuroscience, Brain Research Africa Initiative (BRAIN), Geneva, Switzerland; Department of Translational Neuroscience, Brain Research Africa Initiative (BRAIN), Yaoundé, Cameroon
3 Department of Veterinary Medicine, Ministry of Livestock, Fisheries and Animal Industries, Yaoundé, Cameroon
4 Department of Radiotherapy, Yaoundé General Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon
5 Department of Translational Neuroscience, Brain Research Africa Initiative (BRAIN), Geneva, Switzerland; Department of Translational Neuroscience, Brain Research Africa Initiative (BRAIN); Center for Sustainable Health and Development; Department of Physiological Sciences and Biochemistry, University of Ngaoundéré, Garoua, Cameroon

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Alfred K Njamnshi
Faculty of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Neuroscience Laboratory, The University of Yaounde I and Brain Research Africa Initiative (BRAIN), PO Box: 25625, Yaoundé, Cameroon

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/abr.abr_62_20

Rights and Permissions

Background: Experimental models are needed to better understand the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases to develop novel therapeutics. The neuropathology and clinical signs of acute radiation syndrome resemble those of neurodegenerative conditions. We characterized elevated plus maze (EPM) indicators of cognitive and motor impairment in rats exposed to brain-damaging doses of gamma radiation to develop a model for neurological component of the acute radiation syndrome. Materials and Methods: Technetium 99 m was administered once through tail vein to male Wistar rats to reach an absorbed dose of Gamma radiation of 667 mGy (66.7Rad). Animal performance in the EPM was assessed every 14 days. Rats were observed for 9 weeks for the occurrence of systemic and neurological signs. Comparisons were done between irradiated and nonirradiated rats, and in each group with baseline performance. Results: EPM indicators of cognitive and motor impairment, anxiety, and depression were observed concomitantly and increased with the severity of acute radiation syndrome-like systemic and neurological signs. Alterations in EPM indicators appeared 3 weeks postirradiation and their severity increased with time. Notably, arm transitions and the distance covered in the maze were decreased (−56.71% and −73.62%, P < 0.001), as well as open arm entries and time spent in open arms (−77.78% and −76.19%, P < 0.05) and the indicator of thigmotaxis rearing (−92.45, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Our results suggest that irradiated rat performance in the EPM paradigm reflects disease severity and could be used to perform both acute and subchronic pharmacological studies in acute radiation syndrome-like diseases in rats.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2244    
    Printed16    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded304    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal